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Do you want to explore the treasures of literature while also training yourself as a writer? This flexible course will enable you to do both at the same time. Learning within a strongly creative community, you’ll be set for an intellectually stimulating experience that also develops valuable transferable skills.

In Literature modules you will cover topics from Shakespeare to contemporary fiction, fostering your appreciation, understanding and enjoyment of literary texts. You will produce independent interpretations of texts and concepts, and share your insights with others confidently.

In Creative Writing modules you will hone your craft as a writer with an emphasis on voice, structure and critical reflection. Workshops will allow you to reflect on your practice as you develop your own creative projects.

The course combines academic rigour with a concern for employability skills such as communication and analysis. 

Northumbria University is ranked 15th in English & Creative Writing in the UK (Guardian University League Tables 2020).

96% of students were satisfied with the resources available on this course (National Student Survey, 2018).

Do you want to explore the treasures of literature while also training yourself as a writer? This flexible course will enable you to do both at the same time. Learning within a strongly creative community, you’ll be set for an intellectually stimulating experience that also develops valuable transferable skills.

In Literature modules you will cover topics from Shakespeare to contemporary fiction, fostering your appreciation, understanding and enjoyment of literary texts. You will produce independent interpretations of texts and concepts, and share your insights with others confidently.

In Creative Writing modules you will hone your craft as a writer with an emphasis on voice, structure and critical reflection. Workshops will allow you to reflect on your practice as you develop your own creative projects.

The course combines academic rigour with a concern for employability skills such as communication and analysis. 

Northumbria University is ranked 15th in English & Creative Writing in the UK (Guardian University League Tables 2020).

96% of students were satisfied with the resources available on this course (National Student Survey, 2018).

Course Information

UCAS Code
QW38

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Humanities

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2021

Fee Information

Module Information

Student Life / #IAmNorthumbria

Discover more about life in Newcastle and studying at Northumbria.

Department / Humanities

Our Department of Humanities includes the subject areas of History, English Literature, English Language and Linguistics, Creative Writing and American Studies.

Humanities Video Gallery

Discover more about what you will learn on the course, more about our academics research interests, and hear from current students by watching our videos.

Book an Open Day / Experience English Literature and Creative Writing BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Literature and Creative Writing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Entry Requirements 2020/21

Standard Entry

120 UCAS Tariff points
From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas or the International Baccalaureate

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Subject Requirements:
There are no specific subject requirements for this course

GCSE Requirements:
Students will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4 or C, or the equivalent.

Additional Requirements:
There are no additional requirements for this course

International Qualifications:
We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match those shown above. If you have taken qualifications outside the UK you can find out how your qualifications compare by visiting our country page www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:
International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications <

Entry Requirements 2021/22

Standard Entry

120 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas, or the International Baccalaureate.

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth by using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Subject Requirements:

There are no specific subject requirements for this course.

GCSE Requirements:

Applicants will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4/C, or an equivalent.

Additional Requirements:

There are no additional requirements for this course.

International Qualifications:

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications which may not match those shown above.

If you have qualifications from outside the UK, find out what you need by visiting www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:

International applicants shoud have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2020/21 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,500

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

Scholarships and Discounts

Click here for UK, EU and International Scholarships scholarship, fees, and funding information.


Fees and Funding 2021/22 Entry

UK Fee in Year 1*: £9,250

* The maximum tuition fee that we are permitted to charge for UK students is set by government. Tuition fees may increase in each subsequent academic year of your course, these are subject to government regulations and in line with inflation.



EU Fee in Year 1: £16,000

** You may be eligible for an EU Undergraduate Scholarship


International Fee in Year 1: £16,000

 

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

 

Click here for UK, EU and International Scholarships scholarship, fees, and funding information.

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* By submitting your information you are consenting to your data being processed by Northumbria University (as Data Controller) and Campus Management Corp. (acting as Data Processor). To see the University's privacy policy please click here

How to Apply

Applications via UCAS

Most full-time and sandwich first degrees, extended degrees, DipHE and HND courses require that application is made through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) Clearing House.

If you are at school or college, staff there will advise you on how to apply. If you are not at school or college, you can apply using the UCAS secure, web-based online application system ucasapply.

Applicants apply via UCAS apply wherever there is access to the internet, and full instructions and an online help facility is available. Application details can be checked and printed at any time, text for personal statements and references can be copied and pasted into applications from a word processing package, and applications can normally be processed by the relevant Clearing House within one working day once submitted. More details on apply can be found on the UCAS website at www.ucas.com.

  • The UCAS institution code for Northumbria University is NORTH N77

If you wish to defer your entry, you should ensure you indicate this in section 3i of the application form. Full details of application deadlines and the application fee can be found on the UCAS website. Please note, however, we are unable to consider applications for deferred entry to our Teacher Training, Nursing, Midwifery and Operating Department Practice programmes.

Application Deadlines

Equal consideration is given to all applications received at UCAS by 6.00pm on 15 January. Details of all UCAS deadlines can be found on the UCAS website www.ucas.com.

UCAS will accept applications up to 30 June, but we can only consider these if there are still vacancies in relevant subjects. You are advised to check with the University before applying for popular courses which may already be full. Candidates applying for any courses after early September must follow the UCAS Late Registration Procedure, and we will provide the appropriate form.

Decision Making Process

When we receive your application it will be forwarded to the Admissions Tutor who will consider your application in accordance with the University’s Admissions Policy.

Most subject areas do not require applicants to attend an interview as part of the selection procedure. However, if the standard procedure is to interview candidates, this is specified in the degree programme entrance requirements. Some courses, such as Health, Social Work and Teacher Training, require specific checks or requirements to be put in place during the normal selection process. These are detailed on the individual course details pages.

Fairness and Transparency

The University is committed to a system of admissions that ensures fairness, transparency and equal opportunities within the legal framework of the UK and best practice. All reasonable effort will be made to ensure that no prospective or existing student is unreasonably treated less favourably on the grounds of age, race, colour, nationality, ethnic origin, creed, disability, sexual orientation, gender, marital or parental/carer status, political belief or social or economic class, or any other type of discrimination.

What Happens Next

You will receive one of the following from UCAS or our Admissions Office:

  • Conditional offer which depends on you achieving certain grades from forthcoming examinations, completing relevant checks, or other requirements prior to entry. You may be asked to send us a copy of your certificates/qualifications once these have been received to enable us to confirm your offer. Not all examination results are sent to Universities via UCAS.
  • Unconditional offer if you have already satisfied entry requirements.
  • Reject your application.

Tuition Fee Assessment

Tuition fees are set at different levels for Home/EU and International Students. Before you begin your course the University must establish your tuition fee status. In many cases, the University will be able to make this assessment without requiring any additional information.

Guidance can be found on the UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA) website www.ukcisa.org.uk to help you understand how Higher Education Institutions (HEI’s) make an assessment on your fee status.

Selection Process

Interviews

Applicants who may not have the standard entry qualifications are welcome to apply and may be interviewed. Some courses will interview as part of the selection process. This applies particularly to courses in art and design, teaching and health.

Health Screening

Applicants for Nursing, Midwifery, Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, Primary (Early Years) and Social Work will be required to complete a health questionnaire, and you may be required to attend a doctor or nurse assessment at the University Health Centre.

Prior to beginning your programme, all applicants to Nursing, Midwifery, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy are advised to start a course of Hepatitis B vaccinations, available from your own GP. In addition, Midwifery applicants must provide evidence before they commence training that they are immune to Hepatitis B or have Hepatitis B non-carried status.

Applicants to these courses who have had contact with MRSA in the previous 6 months may be asked to provide evidence that they are not colonised by submitting negative swabs results prior to commencement of training. Alternatively, you may be screened on commencement of the programme.

All applicants will receive vaccination screening at the University Health Centre on commencement of their programme.

Disclosure of Criminal Background

To help the University reduce the risk of harm or injury to any member of its community caused by the criminal behaviour of other students, it must know about any relevant criminal convictions an applicant has.

Relevant criminal convictions are only those convictions for offences against the person, whether of a violent or sexual nature, and convictions for offences involving unlawfully supplying controlled drugs or substances where the conviction concerns commercial drug dealing or trafficking. Convictions that are spent (as defined by the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974) are not considered to be relevant and you should not reveal them - unless you are applying for one of the courses outlined within the following paragraph.

If you are applying for courses in teaching, health, social work and courses involving work with children or vulnerable adults, you must complete the section of your UCAS application form entitled ‘Criminal Convictions’. You must disclose anycriminal convictions, including spent sentences and cautions (including verbal cautions) and bindover orders. Further information on how to complete this section is available from the UCAS booklet ‘How to Apply’. For these courses, applicants are required to undergo police clearance for entry and will need to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) enhanced disclosure form. 

The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) helps employers make safer recruitment decisions and prevent unsuitable people from working with vulnerable groups, including children. It replaces the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) and Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA). Access to the DBS checking service is only available to registered employers who are entitled by law to ask an individual to reveal their full criminal history, including spent convictions - also known as asking 'an exempted question'. The University is such a 'registered employer' and will send you the appropriate documents to fill in if you are offered a place in the course.

If you are convicted of a relevant criminal offence after you have applied, you must tell UCAS and the University. Do not send details of the offence; simply tell UCAS and the University that you have a relevant criminal conviction. You may then be asked to supply more details.

Anti-fraud Checks

Please note that both UCAS and the University follow anti-fraud procedures to detect and prevent fraudulent applications. If it is found that an applicant supplies a fraudulent application then it will be withdrawn.

Plagiarism

Applicants suspected of providing, or found to have provided, false information will be referred to UCAS if their application was made via UCAS. The same is true for applicants who are suspected of omitting, or found to have omitted, information that they are required to disclose according to UCAS regulations. Applications identified by UCAS’s Similarity Detection software to contain plagiarised material will be considered on an individual basis by Admissions Staff, taking into account the nature, relevance and importance of the plagiarism. The University reserves the right to cancel an application or withdraw any offer made if it is found that an application contains false, plagiarised or misleading information.

Extra

The Extra process enables applicants who have not been offered a place, or have declined all offers received, can use EXTRA to apply for other courses that still have vacancies before Clearing starts. The Extra process normally operates from late February until the end of June and Applicants should use the Course Search facility at UCAS to find which courses have vacancies.

Clearing

If you have not succeeded in gaining a place at your firm or insurance university, UCAS will send you details about Clearing, the procedure which matches course vacancies with students who do not have a university place. Information about degree vacancies at Northumbria is published in the national press; and you can also find information on our dedicated Clearing web pages during this period. We operate a Helpline - 0191 40 60 901 - throughout the Clearing period for enquiries about course vacancies.

Adjustment
If an applicant has both met and exceeded the conditions of their firmly accepted offer, they will have up to five calendar days from the time their place was confirmed (or A level results day, whichever is the later) to research places more appropriate to their performance. Applicants will have to nominate themselves for this system, and their eligibility will be confirmed by the institution they apply to adjust to.

Going to University from Care
Northumbria University is proud of its work in widening participation of young people and adults to university. We have recently been successful in being awarded the Frank Buttle Trust Quality Mark for Care Leavers in Higher Education. This mark was created to recognise institutions who go that extra mile to support students who have been in public care. To find out more, visit our Going to University from Care web page.

Disabled Students

Northumbria welcomes enquiries and applications from disabled students whether disability is due to mobility or sensory impairment, specific learning difficulties, mental health issues or a medical condition. Applications from disabled students are processed in the usual way, but applicants should declare their disability at the application stage so that the University can contact them to assess how to meet any support needs they may have. Disabled applicants may be invited to visit the University so that this can be done in person.

To find out more contact:
Disability Support Team
Tel +44 (0)191 227 3849 or
Minicom +44 (0)191 222 1051

International Students

The University has a thriving overseas community and applications from International students are welcome. Advice on the suitability of overseas qualifications is available from:

International Office
Northumbria University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 8ST
UK
Email: international@northumbria.ac.uk
Tel +44 (0)191 227 4274
Fax +44 (0)191 261 1264

(However, if you have already applied to Northumbria and have a query, please contact internationaladmissions@northumbria.ac.uk or telephone 00 44 191 243 7906)

Provision of Information

The University reserves the right at any stage to request applicants and enrolling students to provide additional information about any aspect of their application or enrolment. In the event of any student providing false or inaccurate information at any stage, and/or failing to provide additional information when requested to do so, the University further reserves the right to refuse to consider an application, to withdraw registration, rescind home fees status where applicable, and/or demand payment of any fees or monies due to the University.

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

EL4001 -

Introduction to Literary Studies (Core,20 Credits)

You will be given the opportunity to familiarise yourself with conceptual issues such as canonicity, the unconscious, the tragic, the nature of the author, gender and postmodernity. Lectures will introduce you to these concepts and modes of applying these to literary texts as well as introducing you to new material in the texts themselves. Seminars will follow the lectures, where you will discuss and explore with your tutor and with your fellow students both the texts and their historical and theoretical contexts.

More information

EL4004 -

Reading Poetry (Core,20 Credits)

This module encourages you to read and enjoy poetry whilst also developing your understanding of how figurative language, linguistic choice and formal technique work to produce the meanings that we derive from poetry. The module is structured to help you develop competence in close reading of literary texts and to increase your familiarity with the critical vocabulary that will enable you to discuss and analyse poetic language in an informed manner. You will also be encouraged to increase your awareness of the diverse nature of poetic composition and to recognise the importance of genre, context and form in the reading of poetic language. Working on the principle that close reading is an essential part of critical analysis of any text, the module provides a foundation for all subsequent elements of your studies in English Literature. Moreover, because these skills in understanding poetry are an essential first step in creating it, the module seeks to foster an understanding of the creative process that will improve your familiarity with poetic technique and thus help to develop your creative skills. The module elides the gap between the creative and critical spheres and in so doing enrich both.

More information

EL4014 -

Story (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas of narration. Semester 1 mainly focuses on the structure and techniques of prose fiction. In Semester 2 this is broadened to a wider range of narrative forms, including script. Students will be introduced to a variety of basic key skills related to storytelling, will learn to appreciate the demands of different narrative genres, and will develop an understanding of the nature of story and narrative. This will provide students with a basic framework to underpin the development of their writing practice.

More information

EL4015 -

Creative and Critical Practice (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will learn the habit and discipline of sitting down to write regularly. You will also learn key techniques of prose fiction writing, writerly reflection and critical writing. In particular, you will engage in a range of ‘textual interventions’ that encourage you to explore how other writers write and how you can develop your own writing voice through engagement with that of others. In this way you will also learn to relate critical study of literary texts to writing practice.

More information

EL4016 -

Talking Texts (Core,20 Credits)

This module offers students a forum to develop academic skills in close reading and analysis. A range of texts are examined within a reading-focussed workshop, including: the novel, short stories, poetry, plays, journalism, academic essays and online media such as blogs and flash fiction. Students are exposed to a range of writing in order to consider and develop their own reading practices. The discursive workshops develop speaking, listening, and critical skills through participation in classroom activities. The module prepares students for work at degree level, encouraging them to become independent learners in a supportive environment.

More information

EL4017 -

Gothic Stories: Nineteenth Century to the Present (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will be given the opportunity to study a range of gothic texts from the nineteenth century to the contemporary period. This will provide you with the opportunity to explore the conventions of the genre as well as some of the ways in which gothic writing reflects and/or questions assumptions about race, gender, social class and sexuality. You will learn about the cultural significance of many familiar gothic motifs and figures such as ghosts, uncanny doubles, haunted houses and vampires.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5012 -

Humanities Study Abroad (40 credit) (Optional,40 Credits)

The Study Abroad module is a semester based 40 credit module which is available on degree courses which facilitate study abroad within the programme. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be constructed to meet the learning outcomes for the programme for the semester in question, dependent on suitable modules from the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). The module will be assessed by conversion of graded marks from the host University.

Learning outcomes on the year-long modules on which the student is unable to attend the home institution must be met at the host institution, and marks from the host are incorporated into the modules as part of the overall assessment.

More information

EL5003 -

Early Modern Cultures (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will learn to read texts written in the period 1500-1700 historically. Lectures and seminars will encourage you to learn about the early modern period, and to situate texts by authors such as William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas More, and Philip Sidney. You will learn about poetry, prose, and drama – situating literary genres from the period in relation to themes that include: class, race, sexuality, politics, authority, gender, and ideas of literary production itself. Lectures will trace the afterlives of some of the most influential texts ever written, and will encourage you to read these textual traditions in light of a range of western literary ideologies.

Building upon work completed at Level 4 on early modern authors like Shakespeare and Donne, this module offers students a more comprehensive survey of the early modern period. Encouraging students to read literature historically, Early Modern Cultures fosters key skills in tutor-led and independent reading and research that will complement a range of studies at level 6.

More information

EL5004 -

Modernism and Modernity (Core,20 Credits)

Through this module you will gain an understanding of the relation between literary modernism and modernity in the early part of the twentieth century. The module provides you with conceptual and historical frameworks for understanding the relation between art and social life. It gives you an opportunity to engage with the ways in which different literary genres prompted modernist experiments in form and with the various debates taking place between literary critics, writers, philosophers and cultural historians in early-twentieth-century Britain and the USA.

More information

EL5022 -

Thinking About Voice (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas of voice as applied to creative writing. You will learn about technical aspects of voice in creative writing, e.g. the concepts of register and free indirect discourse. You will also learn about the wider notion of developing an individual creative voice, i.e. the expression of subjectivity, and the importance of originality. You will learn about the way that tone is deployed in different types of writing, and you will learn about the imaginative use of language. All of this will give you tools that you can utilise in your own creative work.

More information

EL5023 -

Working With Structure (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas of structure as applied to narrative forms (fiction, script) and poetry. Students will read and analyse a range of creative texts employing diverse formal structures. Through experimentation, they will make use of these formal structures in their own creative work. They will learn about both the limits and the opportunities offered by different structures in narrative forms and in poetry.

More information

EL5026 -

Literary Revolutions, Eighteenth Century to Romanticism (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will study a range of texts from the eighteenth century to the Romantic period. The module considers a period in which literature and culture witnessed a succession of revolutionary changes. The novel emerged as a new form; female writers and readers took on a new prominence; the print market expanded enormously; and writers responded to the seismic changes in society caused by a period of war, imperial expansion, and political and social revolution. You will study a diverse and unusual range of texts that emerged from this period, and learn how to link the texts to the period’s context.

More information

EL5028 -

Pitch to Publication (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will learn how to develop, edit and contribute to writing projects in the real world, from poetry and short fiction anthologies to special issues of magazines, collections of reviews, and specialist blogs. You will study a range of creative and professional writing projects and produce your own, from initial pitch to writing, publicising, editing and producing the finished item. You will learn to reflect on your own writing identity and the process of writing to a brief, and how to evaluate and write a structured report on a project. You will learn from writing professionals and develop skills which prepare you for your future professional life as well as further study at level 6.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5009 -

Humanities Work Placement Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Work Placement Year module is a 120 credit year-long module available on degree courses which include a work placement year, taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6 (the length of the placement(s) will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks. You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the work placement agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the University.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

AD5010 -

Humanities Study Abroad Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

AT5004 -

Year in International Business (This is made up of 5 modules studied in Newcastle (Semester 1) & Amsterdam (Semester 2) (Optional,120 Credits)

This overarching module descriptor covers the Year in International Business which is made up of 5 modules which students study in Newcastle (semester 1) and Amsterdam (semester 2).

This additional year of studies has been designed to develop students’ business awareness and their soft skills through a semester of study in the UK followed by engagement in studying in Amsterdam and working on real business projects to further enhance and develop this knowledge, skills and attributes.

Semester 1 in the UK comprises three 20-credit modules aimed at students new to business and management, which also equips the students for a semester in Amsterdam, working in teams on a “real-world”, client facing project. Of the modules studies in Semester 1 provide students with the “soft”, “analytical” and “project management” skills necessary to embark on a “real-world” client-centred consultancy project in Semester 2. In Semester 2, students will work move to Amsterdam and study two modules on Northumbria licensed premises. The first module, Group Business Consultancy Project, is a Level 5 40 credit Consultancy Project providing a supported and challenging experience with real business supervised by Northumbria and possibly Dutch academics. The final module complements the development of business knowledge and application through a contextualised consideration of International Business. This will also add to the Business Consultancy experience, thereby guaranteeing a coherent business experience.

The modules are outlined below:

Semester 1
HR9505 Managing People at Work (20 credits)
SM9511 Global Business Environment (20 credits)
AF5022 Financial Decision Making (20 credits)

Semester 2
AT5000 Digital Business (20)
AT5001 Group Business Consultancy Project (40 credits)

In semester 1, students will learn in an environment aligned to that of business students on full time programmes. A mixture of large group and small group sessions will take place. In semester 2, in accordance with the experiential learning pedagogical approach in the Business Clinic operated at Newcastle Business School, the group consultancy work will involve students working in groups, facilitated by academics but also independently and amongst their peers in collaborative project work to provide real business consultancy. Assessment has been developed in accordance with Northumbria’s Assessment for Learning principles including a broad mix of assessment appropriate to the learning outcomes being assessed and with opportunities for formative feedback.

A student who passes all modules will, on successful completion of their undergraduate programme of study, have the title “(Year in International Business UK and Amsterdam)” added to their degree award title. Students who do not pass 120 credits will have those modules that have been completed recorded on their transcript.

More information

AT5007 -

Year in International Multidisciplinary Innovation (4 modules studied in Amsterdam (Semester 1) & Newcastle (Semester 2) (Optional,120 Credits)

What will I learn on this module?

This overarching module descriptor covers the Year in International Multidisciplinary Innovation which is made up of 4 modules that the students will study in Amsterdam (semester 1) and Newcastle (semester 2).

This additional year of studies has been designed to develop students’ creative thinking and practical problem-solving skills in the context of design thinking approaches, all of which will significantly development academic and research skills and so strengthen employability on graduation. This year of study enhances your employability by unlocking and developing your creative problem-solving skills, knowledge, and expertise to make you more employment and industry-ready when you graduate through in multidisciplinary teams throughout your year of study in Amsterdam and Newcastle to creatively tackle and solve real-world challenges.
Semester 1 in Amsterdam comprises of two 20-credit modules aimed at students new to design thinking which also equips them for a semester in Newcastle, working in creative teams on a series of real-world projects that enhance creative thinking skills and attributes and multidisciplinary working practices. The modules studied in Semester 1, Innovative Design Practices and Tools and Multidisciplinary Exploration and Value Creation provide students with analytical design-inspired tools that enable students to examine real-world case studies that require multidisciplinary professional team-based responses and solution formation and implementation. In Semester 2, students will move to Newcastle to study two modules at Northumbria University. The first module, Design-Inspired Research Methods enables students to critically investigate key social, cultural, and technological challenges that modern urban spaces, cities, and professions. The final module, Creative Cities, enables students to engage in the creative comparative research of problems, challenges and potential innovative developments between Amsterdam and Newcastle (in terms of mobility, sustainable practices, energy provision, smart and digital technologies, urban design, or the role of cultural and humanities-oriented institutions).

The modules are outlined below:

Semester 1
AT5005 Innovative Design Practices and Tools (20 credits)
AT5006 Multidisciplinary Exploration and Value Creation (40 credits)

Semester 2
DE5012 Design-Inspired Research Methods (20 credits)
DE5013 Creative Cities (40 credits)

In semester 1, students will learn in a creative environment in the Amsterdam campus dedicated to full time programmes. A mixture of large group and small group sessions will take place in sessions and workshops that bring together AUAS and Northumbria students and staff. The focus of the teaching and learning is on creative interdisciplinary team activities that develop creative thinking and address real-world issues and problems. In semester 2, students engage in comparative city-based research to identify differing challenges facing Amsterdam and Newcastle. Students will approach a range of real-world issues from the perspective of their academic discipline and work with students from other perspectives to see how differing knowledges and skillsets can combine to address challenges in innovative and creative ways. These can include cultural institutions, design, technology, IT, and engineering, architecture, history, and the social sciences. Therefore, the programme is relevant for students from a range academic disciplines who will work together to stress how differing disciplines combine to provide solutions to challenges. Assessment has been developed in accordance with Northumbria’s Assessment for Learning principles including a broad mix of assessment appropriate to the learning outcomes being assessed and with opportunities for formative feedback.

A student who passes all modules will, on successful completion of their undergraduate programme of study, have the title “(Year in International Multidisciplinary Innovation UK and Amsterdam)” added to their degree award title. Students who do not pass 120 credits will have those modules that have been completed recorded on their transcript.

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EL6001 -

English Dissertation (Optional,40 Credits)

In your third year you will be ready to become an independent thinker and researcher. The dissertation is your opportunity to research and write a substantial investigation of a topic that you are really passionate about. Your tutors will support you as you learn how to work independently and to manage a large project. You will also learn project-management, research, presentation and writing skills. You will learn to be self-motivated and independent. By the end of the module you will have produced a major piece of work that you can be proud of, and you will be ready to continue as an independent thinker in further study or in the graduate job you go on to at the end of your third year.

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EL6004 -

Vamps and Virgins: Gothic Sexualities (Optional,20 Credits)

From Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Christabel (1816) to Alan Ball’s True Blood (2008-), this module invites you to explore the dark, shadowy world of the Gothic in relation to a diverse range of literary texts and modern media. Combining the study of familiar canonical fictions with new and challenging material, we will train our focus on the enigmatic figure of the vampire, examining its various transitions and developments through the lens of critical and cultural theory.

Through an analysis of the Gothic, the module aims to develop your critical thinking, as well as your existing knowledge of literature, film, and television dating from 1816 to the present day. In doing so, it will encourage you to reflect on and interrogate the complex ways in which Gothic texts engage with, and intervene in, broader cultural debates about gender and sexuality.

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EL6009 -

Romanticism and Childhood (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will inform you about the transformations to the concept of childhood that occurred in the Romantic period (1760-1830). It will challenge you to analyse various celebrated representations of children and childhood in British Romantic literature. A new and distinctive attitude towards childhood was a core element of Romantic culture. Many British Romantic writers were invested in such issues as children’s education, imaginative fantasy literature, child-psychology, social injustices afflicting children, and religious questions of childhood innocence. This module will encourage you to develop an historical awareness of the changing culture of childhood in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. You will engage with the politics of education and children’s imaginative reading in the wake of the French Revolution (1789). Authors studied include William Wordsworth, William Blake, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Mary Shelley, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and many more important writers of the period. This module encompasses a range of significant literature of the period, including poetry, prose, novels, and children’s literature.

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EL6017 -

History, Myth, Narrative: Prose Writing about the First World War (Optional,20 Credits)

You will explore a selection of key prose texts (novels and short stories) about the First World War that were written between 1914 and the present day. You will relate these novels and short stories to a range of influential critical ideas across literary studies and history. The module will help you to understand the close links between literary writing about the war and the way the war has been remembered in Britain at different points in time and will develop your research skills beyond your own discipline by allowing you to engage with scholarly concepts and sources in history, psychology and sociology. By reading a range of autobiographical and fictional prose texts, you will think about the value of literary texts as sources of cultural history, and you will investigate the changing historical contexts in which these texts have been produced, published and read. Themes and topics you will cover include the representation of soldiers, enemies and allies, class and gender in war writing, formal and publishing aspects and memory and remembrance.

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EL6018 -

The Black Atlantic: Literature, Slavery and Race (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to a range of texts which have been created out of, or about, the experience of African peoples in the diaspora from the seventeenth century to the present. It will encourage you to relate your understanding of the texts to the cultural and historical background from which they developed. Following on from level four core modules this module will develop your understanding of the concept of the ‘Atlantic World’ and theories of local, national and global cultures as well as theories of race and postcolonial theory. You will be encouraged to recognise the activity of the slave trade as the beginning point of the Atlantic World as an imagined space that challenges national and chronological boundaries and speaks of the powerful and enduring legacies of slavery.

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EL6019 -

Writing the Body 1800-1900 (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn that he body is a crucial, if often overlooked element in all literature, whether it be in terms of sexuality, gender, representations of glamorous diseases -such as consumption in the nineteenth century - or the final fate of the body, death. This module aims to introduce students to some of the major forms of the representation of the body in the literature in the period 1800-1900. Through such major authors as Jane Austen, Emily Bronte, Walt Whitman, Edgar Allan Poe and Hermann Melville, the module will investigate how certain genres (romance and gothic, for example) construct certain versions of the body, how different sexual bodies are depicted and contested, and how male and female bodies are differentiated and politicised.

As well as being introduced to relevant literary content in the period you will also learn how to research and generate new literary content via contemporary research methods using on-line resources such as full-text databases (LION etc). As well as finding your own material (a poem on the female body, for example), you will learn how to contextualise it (investigating the author and genre, for example).

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EL6021 -

Shaking up Shakespeare (Optional,20 Credits)

This module develops your awareness and understanding of post-Renaissance adaptations and appropriations of Shakespeare’s work, from the seventeenth century to the present day. It engages with Shakespearean adaptations belonging to different literary genres (in particular, drama and prose fiction) and different media (written texts, films). It examines the ways in which selected Shakespearean texts are transformed in subsequent adaptations, and the issues underpinning these transformations, especially those concerning race, gender, and class. It also engages with theoretical debates surrounding authorship, literary value, canonicity, and popular/high culture.

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EL6023 -

Entertaining Satan (Optional,20 Credits)

This module offers you an opportunity to look in depth at a range of literature and literary forms concerned with demonology, witchcraft and the representation of the devil and devil worship in poetry, prose and drama from c.1590-1678. It does so through the examination of key texts and themes in their historical context across a century of unprecedented political, social and cultural upheaval. Themes include religious fanaticism and fundamentalism, science, gender, social status and the beginnings of the English Enlightenment in its European context. All of these texts investigate and interrogate debates about the role of science and magic, moral authority and the nature of good and evil that apply to the tumultuous time in which they were written and that remain highly relevant today.

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EL6035 -

Creative Writing Project (Optional,40 Credits)

This module provides an opportunity to undertake a sustained, large-scale writing project as the culmination of your degree. It allows you to demonstrate both creative skill and the ability to reflect critically on your creative writing practice.

You will undertake a Creative Writing Project of 8,000 words of prose fiction or 300 lines of poetry. Your creative writing project may take any form that is agreed by the project supervisor, but in most cases will be:
• A collection of poetry;
• A collection of short stories;
• A novella;
• Part of a novel
As well as the creative work, you will submit a critical commentary reflecting on the project. The commentary must be 1,000-4,000 words. The creative work will be 4,000-7,000 words, so that together they make a total of not more than 8,000 words.
As well as the final project, you will give a formatively assessed presentation, and submit summatively assessed draft work, in semester 1.

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EL6042 -

Postwar US Writing (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will enhance your understanding of postwar American literary culture in its broader social, political, and
economic contexts. Mid-century America was a time of profound contradictions: while US citizens lived under the shadow the bomb, many experienced unprecedented economic prosperity and access to new material comforts. We will explore how national paranoia
about the spread of communism and the nuclear arms race sat alongside – and fed into – the postwar image of the American ‘good life’, an image of suburban conformity underpinned by the growth of advertising and consumer culture. We will consider how postwar fiction and poetry challenges this demand for conformity in both content and form: through its complex representations of the American cold war experience and its innovative narrative and poetic strategies. The texts on this module offer insights into postwar attitudes towards a diverse range of topics, including national and international politics, work, leisure, and domesticity, gender and sexuality, and race and ethnicity.

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EL6044 -

Writing Fantasy and Science Fiction (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn how to use the key forms, approaches and techniques of fantasy and science fiction in your own writing. As you explore these genres by reading a range of classic and contemporary texts, you will develop a critical understanding of speculative fiction in theory and practice. You will answer questions such as:
• What is a fantasy or science fiction text?
• How can we read such texts productively?
• What writing strategies do they use?
• How can you produce exciting and original fantasy/science fiction writing yourself?

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EL6045 -

Political Theatre in Early Modern Britain (Optional,20 Credits)

People thought and wrote about politics a lot in the early modern period. Just like today, lives and livelihoods hinged upon the attitudes, loyalties and alliances of those in power – and the theatre was a convenient and accessible place to think about (and sometimes to poke fun at) political figureheads and their ideologies. Also, because men like William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson were, effectively, on the payroll of some of England’s wealthiest and most powerful men and women, their dramatic writings often carried distinct political agendas. Monarchs like Queen Elizabeth I and James VI/I were passionate about literature, and London’s best playwrights and acting companies were employed during their lavish coronation processions – and invited to perform at court during annual festivities. Drama from this period was not only influenced by politics, moreover, it had influential political clout, in and of itself. The theatre explored, explained, critiqued, and shaped political attitudes and ideas – at every level of society.

Building on your reading of early modern authors at levels 4 and 5 in early modern literature, this module will challenge you to read a range of Tudor and Jacobean plays in relation to political change, scandal, and satire. You will develop a specialised understanding of the relationship between literature and politics, and a detailed knowledge of the early modern period’s tumultuous social and religious contexts.

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EL6046 -

Advanced Creative Writing (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is designed for students with some experience in creative writing to further develop their skills in prose and/or poetry, with an emphasis of producing longer pieces of writing. The module will examine the nature of genre, and will explore structure in the novel, novella, short story cycle, long poem and poetic sequence.
Although the focus of the module is on your own writing, we will read and discuss a number of texts in order to improve technique and help you in planning and carrying out your project.
Seminars will run as creative writing workshops in which students respond to writing exercises and learn to offer and receive feedback on their own and others’ work.

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EL6047 -

Twenty First Century Literature: Writing in the Present (Optional,20 Credits)

From Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale (1985) and its popular television adaptation (2017) to Yorgos Lanthimos’ film The Lobster (2015), this module invites you to explore a wide and diverse range of novels, short stories and other media in order to promote and analyse the study of contemporary theoretical debates on gender, love, the body and sexuality.

Through the theoretical lens of feminism, psychoanalysis, queer theory and postmodernism, the module aims to develop your critical thinking and your existing knowledge of literature, film and television, from 1985 to the present day. It will encourage you to explore the complex issues raised by diverse critical theory and close analysis of a range of late twentieth and twenty-first century literature, film and television adaptation. By doing so, you will reflect on the ways that twenty-first literature and other media engages with, interrogates and often offers alternative narratives on present debates about gender, love, the body and sexuality.

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EL6049 -

From Jane Austen to Austenland: Representing the Regency in Literature and Film (Optional,20 Credits)

The Regency (1810-1820) is condensed and complex period of contrasts; whilst precipitating significant and lasting changes in literature, art, theatre, fashion, and architecture, it was also a period that was beset by war, ruthless suppression of popular protest, sexual scandal, and the Regent himself was an object of contempt and ridicule. However, the Regency has come to be represented in popular culture as the lost and last age of romance and elegance, partly the result of enhanced connections being made between Austen and the heritage industries in modern adaptations. This module examines representations of the Regency in literature and film, beginning with the works of Jane Austen, all of which were published during this period.

We will begin with an introduction to the social, cultural and political issues of the period, and we will consider Austen as a writer of the Regency. We will move on to consider the significance of twentieth-century adaptations, imitations and appropriations of Austen and representations of the Regency in the works of historical novelists such as Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland, and more contemporary works such as Shannon Hale’s ‘Austenland’. We will also consider the proliferation of Austen and the Regency-based texts in the American market in relation to thinking about both as a form of heritage tourism and escapism. Overall, we will be exploring the impact of Austen upon popular culture, how popular culture fosters a reconsideration of Austen and how we engage with both in relation how we envision our cultural past.

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EL6050 -

Making Books (Optional,20 Credits)

The eighteenth-century was a profoundly innovative moment in terms of the invention and development of the novel and the rapid expansion of the early book trade. But so often we read eighteenth-century fiction in modern, digitally-produced editions. How were eighteenth-century books first made? How are they made today? On this module, you will study individual literary texts alongside printing practices which have shaped and continue to contribute to the book trade. By studying literature through practical demonstrations and history of book production, you will build on previous knowledge gained in second and third year core modules in understanding how the book trade of today builds on the print cultures of the past. You will learn how to interpret as well as how to present and edit eighteenth-century literature, through being introduced to bibliographical and digital research methods. This module will enhance your knowledge and appreciation of eighteenth-century literature and build on your awareness of the print cultural contexts of book production in this period, including form, format, typography and editorial apparatus.

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YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

EL4001 -

Introduction to Literary Studies (Core,20 Credits)

You will be given the opportunity to familiarise yourself with conceptual issues such as canonicity, the unconscious, the tragic, the nature of the author, gender and postmodernity. Lectures will introduce you to these concepts and modes of applying these to literary texts as well as introducing you to new material in the texts themselves. Seminars will follow the lectures, where you will discuss and explore with your tutor and with your fellow students both the texts and their historical and theoretical contexts.

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EL4004 -

Reading Poetry (Core,20 Credits)

This module encourages you to read and enjoy poetry whilst also developing your understanding of how figurative language, linguistic choice and formal technique work to produce the meanings that we derive from poetry. The module is structured to help you develop competence in close reading of literary texts and to increase your familiarity with the critical vocabulary that will enable you to discuss and analyse poetic language in an informed manner. You will also be encouraged to increase your awareness of the diverse nature of poetic composition and to recognise the importance of genre, context and form in the reading of poetic language. Working on the principle that close reading is an essential part of critical analysis of any text, the module provides a foundation for all subsequent elements of your studies in English Literature. Moreover, because these skills in understanding poetry are an essential first step in creating it, the module seeks to foster an understanding of the creative process that will improve your familiarity with poetic technique and thus help to develop your creative skills. The module elides the gap between the creative and critical spheres and in so doing enrich both.

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EL4014 -

Story (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas of narration. Semester 1 mainly focuses on the structure and techniques of prose fiction. In Semester 2 this is broadened to a wider range of narrative forms, including script. Students will be introduced to a variety of basic key skills related to storytelling, will learn to appreciate the demands of different narrative genres, and will develop an understanding of the nature of story and narrative. This will provide students with a basic framework to underpin the development of their writing practice.

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EL4015 -

Creative and Critical Practice (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will learn the habit and discipline of sitting down to write regularly. You will also learn key techniques of prose fiction writing, writerly reflection and critical writing. In particular, you will engage in a range of ‘textual interventions’ that encourage you to explore how other writers write and how you can develop your own writing voice through engagement with that of others. In this way you will also learn to relate critical study of literary texts to writing practice.

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EL4016 -

Talking Texts (Core,20 Credits)

This module offers students a forum to develop academic skills in close reading and analysis. A range of texts are examined within a reading-focussed workshop, including: the novel, short stories, poetry, plays, journalism, academic essays and online media such as blogs and flash fiction. Students are exposed to a range of writing in order to consider and develop their own reading practices. The discursive workshops develop speaking, listening, and critical skills through participation in classroom activities. The module prepares students for work at degree level, encouraging them to become independent learners in a supportive environment.

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EL4017 -

Gothic Stories: Nineteenth Century to the Present (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will be given the opportunity to study a range of gothic texts from the nineteenth century to the contemporary period. This will provide you with the opportunity to explore the conventions of the genre as well as some of the ways in which gothic writing reflects and/or questions assumptions about race, gender, social class and sexuality. You will learn about the cultural significance of many familiar gothic motifs and figures such as ghosts, uncanny doubles, haunted houses and vampires.

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YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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AD5012 -

Humanities Study Abroad (40 credit) (Optional,40 Credits)

The Study Abroad module is a semester based 40 credit module which is available on degree courses which facilitate study abroad within the programme. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be constructed to meet the learning outcomes for the programme for the semester in question, dependent on suitable modules from the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). The module will be assessed by conversion of graded marks from the host University.

Learning outcomes on the year-long modules on which the student is unable to attend the home institution must be met at the host institution, and marks from the host are incorporated into the modules as part of the overall assessment.

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EL5003 -

Early Modern Cultures (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will learn to read texts written in the period 1500-1700 historically. Lectures and seminars will encourage you to learn about the early modern period, and to situate texts by authors such as William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas More, and Philip Sidney. You will learn about poetry, prose, and drama – situating literary genres from the period in relation to themes that include: class, race, sexuality, politics, authority, gender, and ideas of literary production itself. Lectures will trace the afterlives of some of the most influential texts ever written, and will encourage you to read these textual traditions in light of a range of western literary ideologies.

Building upon work completed at Level 4 on early modern authors like Shakespeare and Donne, this module offers students a more comprehensive survey of the early modern period. Encouraging students to read literature historically, Early Modern Cultures fosters key skills in tutor-led and independent reading and research that will complement a range of studies at level 6.

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EL5004 -

Modernism and Modernity (Core,20 Credits)

Through this module you will gain an understanding of the relation between literary modernism and modernity in the early part of the twentieth century. The module provides you with conceptual and historical frameworks for understanding the relation between art and social life. It gives you an opportunity to engage with the ways in which different literary genres prompted modernist experiments in form and with the various debates taking place between literary critics, writers, philosophers and cultural historians in early-twentieth-century Britain and the USA.

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EL5022 -

Thinking About Voice (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas of voice as applied to creative writing. You will learn about technical aspects of voice in creative writing, e.g. the concepts of register and free indirect discourse. You will also learn about the wider notion of developing an individual creative voice, i.e. the expression of subjectivity, and the importance of originality. You will learn about the way that tone is deployed in different types of writing, and you will learn about the imaginative use of language. All of this will give you tools that you can utilise in your own creative work.

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EL5023 -

Working With Structure (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas of structure as applied to narrative forms (fiction, script) and poetry. Students will read and analyse a range of creative texts employing diverse formal structures. Through experimentation, they will make use of these formal structures in their own creative work. They will learn about both the limits and the opportunities offered by different structures in narrative forms and in poetry.

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EL5026 -

Literary Revolutions, Eighteenth Century to Romanticism (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will study a range of texts from the eighteenth century to the Romantic period. The module considers a period in which literature and culture witnessed a succession of revolutionary changes. The novel emerged as a new form; female writers and readers took on a new prominence; the print market expanded enormously; and writers responded to the seismic changes in society caused by a period of war, imperial expansion, and political and social revolution. You will study a diverse and unusual range of texts that emerged from this period, and learn how to link the texts to the period’s context.

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EL5028 -

Pitch to Publication (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will learn how to develop, edit and contribute to writing projects in the real world, from poetry and short fiction anthologies to special issues of magazines, collections of reviews, and specialist blogs. You will study a range of creative and professional writing projects and produce your own, from initial pitch to writing, publicising, editing and producing the finished item. You will learn to reflect on your own writing identity and the process of writing to a brief, and how to evaluate and write a structured report on a project. You will learn from writing professionals and develop skills which prepare you for your future professional life as well as further study at level 6.

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YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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AD5009 -

Humanities Work Placement Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Work Placement Year module is a 120 credit year-long module available on degree courses which include a work placement year, taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6 (the length of the placement(s) will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks. You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the work placement agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the University.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

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AD5010 -

Humanities Study Abroad Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

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AT5004 -

Year in International Business (This is made up of 5 modules studied in Newcastle (Semester 1) & Amsterdam (Semester 2) (Optional,120 Credits)

This overarching module descriptor covers the Year in International Business which is made up of 5 modules which students study in Newcastle (semester 1) and Amsterdam (semester 2).

This additional year of studies has been designed to develop students’ business awareness and their soft skills through a semester of study in the UK followed by engagement in studying in Amsterdam and working on real business projects to further enhance and develop this knowledge, skills and attributes.

Semester 1 in the UK comprises three 20-credit modules aimed at students new to business and management, which also equips the students for a semester in Amsterdam, working in teams on a “real-world”, client facing project. Of the modules studies in Semester 1 provide students with the “soft”, “analytical” and “project management” skills necessary to embark on a “real-world” client-centred consultancy project in Semester 2. In Semester 2, students will work move to Amsterdam and study two modules on Northumbria licensed premises. The first module, Group Business Consultancy Project, is a Level 5 40 credit Consultancy Project providing a supported and challenging experience with real business supervised by Northumbria and possibly Dutch academics. The final module complements the development of business knowledge and application through a contextualised consideration of International Business. This will also add to the Business Consultancy experience, thereby guaranteeing a coherent business experience.

The modules are outlined below:

Semester 1
HR9505 Managing People at Work (20 credits)
SM9511 Global Business Environment (20 credits)
AF5022 Financial Decision Making (20 credits)

Semester 2
AT5000 Digital Business (20)
AT5001 Group Business Consultancy Project (40 credits)

In semester 1, students will learn in an environment aligned to that of business students on full time programmes. A mixture of large group and small group sessions will take place. In semester 2, in accordance with the experiential learning pedagogical approach in the Business Clinic operated at Newcastle Business School, the group consultancy work will involve students working in groups, facilitated by academics but also independently and amongst their peers in collaborative project work to provide real business consultancy. Assessment has been developed in accordance with Northumbria’s Assessment for Learning principles including a broad mix of assessment appropriate to the learning outcomes being assessed and with opportunities for formative feedback.

A student who passes all modules will, on successful completion of their undergraduate programme of study, have the title “(Year in International Business UK and Amsterdam)” added to their degree award title. Students who do not pass 120 credits will have those modules that have been completed recorded on their transcript.

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AT5007 -

Year in International Multidisciplinary Innovation (4 modules studied in Amsterdam (Semester 1) & Newcastle (Semester 2) (Optional,120 Credits)

What will I learn on this module?

This overarching module descriptor covers the Year in International Multidisciplinary Innovation which is made up of 4 modules that the students will study in Amsterdam (semester 1) and Newcastle (semester 2).

This additional year of studies has been designed to develop students’ creative thinking and practical problem-solving skills in the context of design thinking approaches, all of which will significantly development academic and research skills and so strengthen employability on graduation. This year of study enhances your employability by unlocking and developing your creative problem-solving skills, knowledge, and expertise to make you more employment and industry-ready when you graduate through in multidisciplinary teams throughout your year of study in Amsterdam and Newcastle to creatively tackle and solve real-world challenges.
Semester 1 in Amsterdam comprises of two 20-credit modules aimed at students new to design thinking which also equips them for a semester in Newcastle, working in creative teams on a series of real-world projects that enhance creative thinking skills and attributes and multidisciplinary working practices. The modules studied in Semester 1, Innovative Design Practices and Tools and Multidisciplinary Exploration and Value Creation provide students with analytical design-inspired tools that enable students to examine real-world case studies that require multidisciplinary professional team-based responses and solution formation and implementation. In Semester 2, students will move to Newcastle to study two modules at Northumbria University. The first module, Design-Inspired Research Methods enables students to critically investigate key social, cultural, and technological challenges that modern urban spaces, cities, and professions. The final module, Creative Cities, enables students to engage in the creative comparative research of problems, challenges and potential innovative developments between Amsterdam and Newcastle (in terms of mobility, sustainable practices, energy provision, smart and digital technologies, urban design, or the role of cultural and humanities-oriented institutions).

The modules are outlined below:

Semester 1
AT5005 Innovative Design Practices and Tools (20 credits)
AT5006 Multidisciplinary Exploration and Value Creation (40 credits)

Semester 2
DE5012 Design-Inspired Research Methods (20 credits)
DE5013 Creative Cities (40 credits)

In semester 1, students will learn in a creative environment in the Amsterdam campus dedicated to full time programmes. A mixture of large group and small group sessions will take place in sessions and workshops that bring together AUAS and Northumbria students and staff. The focus of the teaching and learning is on creative interdisciplinary team activities that develop creative thinking and address real-world issues and problems. In semester 2, students engage in comparative city-based research to identify differing challenges facing Amsterdam and Newcastle. Students will approach a range of real-world issues from the perspective of their academic discipline and work with students from other perspectives to see how differing knowledges and skillsets can combine to address challenges in innovative and creative ways. These can include cultural institutions, design, technology, IT, and engineering, architecture, history, and the social sciences. Therefore, the programme is relevant for students from a range academic disciplines who will work together to stress how differing disciplines combine to provide solutions to challenges. Assessment has been developed in accordance with Northumbria’s Assessment for Learning principles including a broad mix of assessment appropriate to the learning outcomes being assessed and with opportunities for formative feedback.

A student who passes all modules will, on successful completion of their undergraduate programme of study, have the title “(Year in International Multidisciplinary Innovation UK and Amsterdam)” added to their degree award title. Students who do not pass 120 credits will have those modules that have been completed recorded on their transcript.

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EL6001 -

English Dissertation (Optional,40 Credits)

In your third year you will be ready to become an independent thinker and researcher. The dissertation is your opportunity to research and write a substantial investigation of a topic that you are really passionate about. Your tutors will support you as you learn how to work independently and to manage a large project. You will also learn project-management, research, presentation and writing skills. You will learn to be self-motivated and independent. By the end of the module you will have produced a major piece of work that you can be proud of, and you will be ready to continue as an independent thinker in further study or in the graduate job you go on to at the end of your third year.

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EL6004 -

Vamps and Virgins: Gothic Sexualities (Optional,20 Credits)

From Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Christabel (1816) to Alan Ball’s True Blood (2008-), this module invites you to explore the dark, shadowy world of the Gothic in relation to a diverse range of literary texts and modern media. Combining the study of familiar canonical fictions with new and challenging material, we will train our focus on the enigmatic figure of the vampire, examining its various transitions and developments through the lens of critical and cultural theory.

Through an analysis of the Gothic, the module aims to develop your critical thinking, as well as your existing knowledge of literature, film, and television dating from 1816 to the present day. In doing so, it will encourage you to reflect on and interrogate the complex ways in which Gothic texts engage with, and intervene in, broader cultural debates about gender and sexuality.

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EL6009 -

Romanticism and Childhood (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will inform you about the transformations to the concept of childhood that occurred in the Romantic period (1760-1830). It will challenge you to analyse various celebrated representations of children and childhood in British Romantic literature. A new and distinctive attitude towards childhood was a core element of Romantic culture. Many British Romantic writers were invested in such issues as children’s education, imaginative fantasy literature, child-psychology, social injustices afflicting children, and religious questions of childhood innocence. This module will encourage you to develop an historical awareness of the changing culture of childhood in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. You will engage with the politics of education and children’s imaginative reading in the wake of the French Revolution (1789). Authors studied include William Wordsworth, William Blake, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Mary Shelley, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and many more important writers of the period. This module encompasses a range of significant literature of the period, including poetry, prose, novels, and children’s literature.

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EL6017 -

History, Myth, Narrative: Prose Writing about the First World War (Optional,20 Credits)

You will explore a selection of key prose texts (novels and short stories) about the First World War that were written between 1914 and the present day. You will relate these novels and short stories to a range of influential critical ideas across literary studies and history. The module will help you to understand the close links between literary writing about the war and the way the war has been remembered in Britain at different points in time and will develop your research skills beyond your own discipline by allowing you to engage with scholarly concepts and sources in history, psychology and sociology. By reading a range of autobiographical and fictional prose texts, you will think about the value of literary texts as sources of cultural history, and you will investigate the changing historical contexts in which these texts have been produced, published and read. Themes and topics you will cover include the representation of soldiers, enemies and allies, class and gender in war writing, formal and publishing aspects and memory and remembrance.

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EL6018 -

The Black Atlantic: Literature, Slavery and Race (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to a range of texts which have been created out of, or about, the experience of African peoples in the diaspora from the seventeenth century to the present. It will encourage you to relate your understanding of the texts to the cultural and historical background from which they developed. Following on from level four core modules this module will develop your understanding of the concept of the ‘Atlantic World’ and theories of local, national and global cultures as well as theories of race and postcolonial theory. You will be encouraged to recognise the activity of the slave trade as the beginning point of the Atlantic World as an imagined space that challenges national and chronological boundaries and speaks of the powerful and enduring legacies of slavery.

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EL6019 -

Writing the Body 1800-1900 (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn that he body is a crucial, if often overlooked element in all literature, whether it be in terms of sexuality, gender, representations of glamorous diseases -such as consumption in the nineteenth century - or the final fate of the body, death. This module aims to introduce students to some of the major forms of the representation of the body in the literature in the period 1800-1900. Through such major authors as Jane Austen, Emily Bronte, Walt Whitman, Edgar Allan Poe and Hermann Melville, the module will investigate how certain genres (romance and gothic, for example) construct certain versions of the body, how different sexual bodies are depicted and contested, and how male and female bodies are differentiated and politicised.

As well as being introduced to relevant literary content in the period you will also learn how to research and generate new literary content via contemporary research methods using on-line resources such as full-text databases (LION etc). As well as finding your own material (a poem on the female body, for example), you will learn how to contextualise it (investigating the author and genre, for example).

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EL6021 -

Shaking up Shakespeare (Optional,20 Credits)

This module develops your awareness and understanding of post-Renaissance adaptations and appropriations of Shakespeare’s work, from the seventeenth century to the present day. It engages with Shakespearean adaptations belonging to different literary genres (in particular, drama and prose fiction) and different media (written texts, films). It examines the ways in which selected Shakespearean texts are transformed in subsequent adaptations, and the issues underpinning these transformations, especially those concerning race, gender, and class. It also engages with theoretical debates surrounding authorship, literary value, canonicity, and popular/high culture.

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EL6023 -

Entertaining Satan (Optional,20 Credits)

This module offers you an opportunity to look in depth at a range of literature and literary forms concerned with demonology, witchcraft and the representation of the devil and devil worship in poetry, prose and drama from c.1590-1678. It does so through the examination of key texts and themes in their historical context across a century of unprecedented political, social and cultural upheaval. Themes include religious fanaticism and fundamentalism, science, gender, social status and the beginnings of the English Enlightenment in its European context. All of these texts investigate and interrogate debates about the role of science and magic, moral authority and the nature of good and evil that apply to the tumultuous time in which they were written and that remain highly relevant today.

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EL6035 -

Creative Writing Project (Optional,40 Credits)

This module provides an opportunity to undertake a sustained, large-scale writing project as the culmination of your degree. It allows you to demonstrate both creative skill and the ability to reflect critically on your creative writing practice.

You will undertake a Creative Writing Project of 8,000 words of prose fiction or 300 lines of poetry. Your creative writing project may take any form that is agreed by the project supervisor, but in most cases will be:
• A collection of poetry;
• A collection of short stories;
• A novella;
• Part of a novel
As well as the creative work, you will submit a critical commentary reflecting on the project. The commentary must be 1,000-4,000 words. The creative work will be 4,000-7,000 words, so that together they make a total of not more than 8,000 words.
As well as the final project, you will give a formatively assessed presentation, and submit summatively assessed draft work, in semester 1.

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EL6042 -

Postwar US Writing (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will enhance your understanding of postwar American literary culture in its broader social, political, and
economic contexts. Mid-century America was a time of profound contradictions: while US citizens lived under the shadow the bomb, many experienced unprecedented economic prosperity and access to new material comforts. We will explore how national paranoia
about the spread of communism and the nuclear arms race sat alongside – and fed into – the postwar image of the American ‘good life’, an image of suburban conformity underpinned by the growth of advertising and consumer culture. We will consider how postwar fiction and poetry challenges this demand for conformity in both content and form: through its complex representations of the American cold war experience and its innovative narrative and poetic strategies. The texts on this module offer insights into postwar attitudes towards a diverse range of topics, including national and international politics, work, leisure, and domesticity, gender and sexuality, and race and ethnicity.

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EL6044 -

Writing Fantasy and Science Fiction (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn how to use the key forms, approaches and techniques of fantasy and science fiction in your own writing. As you explore these genres by reading a range of classic and contemporary texts, you will develop a critical understanding of speculative fiction in theory and practice. You will answer questions such as:
• What is a fantasy or science fiction text?
• How can we read such texts productively?
• What writing strategies do they use?
• How can you produce exciting and original fantasy/science fiction writing yourself?

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EL6045 -

Political Theatre in Early Modern Britain (Optional,20 Credits)

People thought and wrote about politics a lot in the early modern period. Just like today, lives and livelihoods hinged upon the attitudes, loyalties and alliances of those in power – and the theatre was a convenient and accessible place to think about (and sometimes to poke fun at) political figureheads and their ideologies. Also, because men like William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson were, effectively, on the payroll of some of England’s wealthiest and most powerful men and women, their dramatic writings often carried distinct political agendas. Monarchs like Queen Elizabeth I and James VI/I were passionate about literature, and London’s best playwrights and acting companies were employed during their lavish coronation processions – and invited to perform at court during annual festivities. Drama from this period was not only influenced by politics, moreover, it had influential political clout, in and of itself. The theatre explored, explained, critiqued, and shaped political attitudes and ideas – at every level of society.

Building on your reading of early modern authors at levels 4 and 5 in early modern literature, this module will challenge you to read a range of Tudor and Jacobean plays in relation to political change, scandal, and satire. You will develop a specialised understanding of the relationship between literature and politics, and a detailed knowledge of the early modern period’s tumultuous social and religious contexts.

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EL6046 -

Advanced Creative Writing (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is designed for students with some experience in creative writing to further develop their skills in prose and/or poetry, with an emphasis of producing longer pieces of writing. The module will examine the nature of genre, and will explore structure in the novel, novella, short story cycle, long poem and poetic sequence.
Although the focus of the module is on your own writing, we will read and discuss a number of texts in order to improve technique and help you in planning and carrying out your project.
Seminars will run as creative writing workshops in which students respond to writing exercises and learn to offer and receive feedback on their own and others’ work.

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EL6047 -

Twenty First Century Literature: Writing in the Present (Optional,20 Credits)

From Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale (1985) and its popular television adaptation (2017) to Yorgos Lanthimos’ film The Lobster (2015), this module invites you to explore a wide and diverse range of novels, short stories and other media in order to promote and analyse the study of contemporary theoretical debates on gender, love, the body and sexuality.

Through the theoretical lens of feminism, psychoanalysis, queer theory and postmodernism, the module aims to develop your critical thinking and your existing knowledge of literature, film and television, from 1985 to the present day. It will encourage you to explore the complex issues raised by diverse critical theory and close analysis of a range of late twentieth and twenty-first century literature, film and television adaptation. By doing so, you will reflect on the ways that twenty-first literature and other media engages with, interrogates and often offers alternative narratives on present debates about gender, love, the body and sexuality.

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EL6049 -

From Jane Austen to Austenland: Representing the Regency in Literature and Film (Optional,20 Credits)

The Regency (1810-1820) is condensed and complex period of contrasts; whilst precipitating significant and lasting changes in literature, art, theatre, fashion, and architecture, it was also a period that was beset by war, ruthless suppression of popular protest, sexual scandal, and the Regent himself was an object of contempt and ridicule. However, the Regency has come to be represented in popular culture as the lost and last age of romance and elegance, partly the result of enhanced connections being made between Austen and the heritage industries in modern adaptations. This module examines representations of the Regency in literature and film, beginning with the works of Jane Austen, all of which were published during this period.

We will begin with an introduction to the social, cultural and political issues of the period, and we will consider Austen as a writer of the Regency. We will move on to consider the significance of twentieth-century adaptations, imitations and appropriations of Austen and representations of the Regency in the works of historical novelists such as Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland, and more contemporary works such as Shannon Hale’s ‘Austenland’. We will also consider the proliferation of Austen and the Regency-based texts in the American market in relation to thinking about both as a form of heritage tourism and escapism. Overall, we will be exploring the impact of Austen upon popular culture, how popular culture fosters a reconsideration of Austen and how we engage with both in relation how we envision our cultural past.

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EL6050 -

Making Books (Optional,20 Credits)

The eighteenth-century was a profoundly innovative moment in terms of the invention and development of the novel and the rapid expansion of the early book trade. But so often we read eighteenth-century fiction in modern, digitally-produced editions. How were eighteenth-century books first made? How are they made today? On this module, you will study individual literary texts alongside printing practices which have shaped and continue to contribute to the book trade. By studying literature through practical demonstrations and history of book production, you will build on previous knowledge gained in second and third year core modules in understanding how the book trade of today builds on the print cultures of the past. You will learn how to interpret as well as how to present and edit eighteenth-century literature, through being introduced to bibliographical and digital research methods. This module will enhance your knowledge and appreciation of eighteenth-century literature and build on your awareness of the print cultural contexts of book production in this period, including form, format, typography and editorial apparatus.

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YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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To start your application, simply select the month you would like to start your course.

English Literature and Creative Writing BA (Hons)

Home or EU applicants please apply through UCAS

International applicants please apply using the links below

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All information on this course page is accurate at the time of viewing.

Courses starting in 2021 are offered as a mix of online and face to face teaching due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.

We continue to monitor government and local authority guidance in relation to Covid-19 and we are ready and able to flex accordingly to ensure the health and safety of our students and staff.

Students will be required to attend campus as far as restrictions allow. Contact time will increase as restrictions ease, or decrease, potentially to a full online offer, should restrictions increase.

Our online activity will be delivered through Blackboard Ultra, enabling collaboration, connection and engagement with materials and people.

 

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