Skip navigation
download pdf image

Enter your details to receive an email with a link to a downloadable PDF of this course and to receive the latest news and information from Northumbria University

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

CLOSE

Ready to learn the very latest computing techniques, which are set to put you ahead of the game in Networks and Cyber Security?

This course has been created to meet global demand for skilled individuals who understand how computers work, how networks are designed, built and configured, how Cybersecurity works in an age where the online world is so vulnerable to attacks and how software is used to monitor and secure these systems. It covers a broad range of computing specialisms and it will open the door to a vast range of careers within this industry. From day one, you will be immersed in an exciting, innovative environment where you will develop your theoretical and technical knowledge and skills which will be directly relatable to your future career. The course offers opportunities for Cisco CCNA module certifications through Net Academy and for Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) certification.

Accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered IT Professional. (British Computing Society (BCS) 2019)

Accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirements for incorporated Engineer and partially meeting the academic requirement for a Chartered Engineer  (British Computing Society (BCS) 2019)

93% of students said that they are satisfied overall with their course (National Student Survey 2018)

For more information in relation to studying Networks and Cyber Security, contact Northumbria University today on 0191 406 0901. 

Ready to learn the very latest computing techniques, which are set to put you ahead of the game in Networks and Cyber Security?

This course has been created to meet global demand for skilled individuals who understand how computers work, how networks are designed, built and configured, how Cybersecurity works in an age where the online world is so vulnerable to attacks and how software is used to monitor and secure these systems. It covers a broad range of computing specialisms and it will open the door to a vast range of careers within this industry. From day one, you will be immersed in an exciting, innovative environment where you will develop your theoretical and technical knowledge and skills which will be directly relatable to your future career. The course offers opportunities for Cisco CCNA module certifications through Net Academy and for Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) certification.

Accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered IT Professional. (British Computing Society (BCS) 2019)

Accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirements for incorporated Engineer and partially meeting the academic requirement for a Chartered Engineer  (British Computing Society (BCS) 2019)

93% of students said that they are satisfied overall with their course (National Student Survey 2018)

For more information in relation to studying Networks and Cyber Security, contact Northumbria University today on 0191 406 0901. 

Course Information

UCAS Code
G4W3

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Computer and Information Sciences

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2021 or September 2022

Fee Information

Module Information

Student Profiles / Computer Networks and Cyber Security BSc (Hons)

Hear what it is really like to study Computer Networks and Cyber Security BSc (Hons) from our current students.

Department / Computer and Information Sciences

Across all of our undergraduate programmes approximately 85% of students graduate with a First Class or Upper Second Class honours degree (Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) 2015/16).

Student Life

A great social scene can be found at the heart of our campuses, featuring award-winning bars and a huge range of clubs and societies to join you'll be sure to meet people who share your enthusiasms.

Book an Open Day / Experience Computer Networks and Cyber Security BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Computer Networks and Cyber Security. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Entry Requirements 2021/22

Standard Entry

120 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas, or the International Baccalaureate.

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth by using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Subject Requirements:

There are no specific subject requirements for this course.

GCSE Requirements:

Applicants will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4/C, or an equivalent.

Additional Requirements:

There are no additional requirements for this course.

International Qualifications:

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications which may not match those shown above.

If you have qualifications from outside the UK, find out what you need by visiting www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:

International applicants shoud have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Entry Requirements 2022/23

Standard Entry

120 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas, or the International Baccalaureate.

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth by using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Subject Requirements:

There are no specific subject requirements for this course.

GCSE Requirements:

Applicants will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4/C, or an equivalent.

Additional Requirements:

There are no additional requirements for this course.

International Qualifications:

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications which may not match those shown above.

If you have qualifications from outside the UK, find out what you need by visiting www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:

International applicants shoud have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2021/22 Entry

UK Fee in Year 1: £9,250

EU Fee in Year 1: £16,000

International Fee in Year 1: £16,000

 

Click here for UK, EU and International Scholarships scholarship, fees, and funding information.

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

Fees and Funding 2022/23 Entry

UK Fee in Year 1*: TBC

* The maximum tuition fee that we are permitted to charge for UK students is set by government. Tuition fees may increase in each subsequent academic year of your course, these are subject to government regulations and in line with inflation.



EU Fee in Year 1: **TBC

International Fee in Year 1: TBC

 

ADDITIONAL COSTS

TBC

If you'd like to receive news and information from us in the future about the course or finance then please complete the below form

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

How to Apply

Please use the Apply Now button at the top of this page to submit your application.

Certain applications may need to be submitted via an external application system, such as UCAS, Lawcabs or DfE Apply.

The Apply Now button will redirect you to the relevant website if this is the case.

You can find further application advice, such as what to include in your application and what happens after you apply, on our Admissions Hub Admissions | Northumbria University



Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

KF4001 -

Introduction to Computer Security and Forensics (Core,20 Credits)

You will be given a rounded introduction to the principles of computer forensics and cyber security from both a theoretical and technical perspective and also provide a contextual setting for these disciplines by an examination of the criminal justice system within England and Wales. The ethical responsibilities of studying computer forensics and cyber security and the need to address personal and professional integrity will be included in the module.

More information

KF4002 -

Network Technology 1 (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn about the reference communication architecture, communication protocols, networking devices, IP addressing important performance metrics for communication networks, wireless network and fundamentals of physical layer communication.

More information

KF4005 -

Operating Systems Fundamentals (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces you to the fundamentals of operating systems: processes/threads, communication, memory management, file systems, I/O, security, scripting languages and tools. You will study:
* processes and threads: concepts, use and implementation, creation and destruction, context switching, scheduling;
* communication (IPC): shared memory, message passing, pipes;
* memory management: memory allocation schemes, paging, virtual memory;
* persistent storage and file systems: file concept, file system structure and implementation, directories, free space allocation;
* I/O: input and output devices, device handlers, the I/O API;
* security: access control, user authentication;
* scripting languages and tools: use of languages and tools (e.g. the command shell, Python) for monitoring, investigating and administering an operating system and its resources, employ a relational database (including the design and execution of simple SQL queries).

More information

KF4009 -

Web Technologies (Core,20 Credits)

The aim of the module is to provide you with knowledge and skills in designing and implementing web applications, including appropriate technologies. You will develop web based applications in accordance to key web standards and user needs. The module will also emphasise the technical aspects of web development and will introduce web security issues. In particular, you will cover topics such as:

• Structured mark-up
• Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), including layout design using CSS
• Usability and accessibility, including user needs
• Information architecture
• Client-side processing
• Web serving
• Introduction to server-side programming
• Introduction to web related security issues

More information

KF4010 -

Computing Fundamentals (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide you with the theoretical and practical basis to understand the design and construction of Computer software and hardware. You will be introduced to the underlying theory of Computation and the major paradigms of Computation. This will include the concepts of software, systems and data modelling and in particular the major computational models and programming paradigms. To complement this theoretical underpinning you will also study the standard von Neumann computer architecture and von Neumann machine programming.

More information

KV4000 -

Programming 1 (Core,20 Credits)

During this module you will learn how to create software using a programming language. You will learn to select and apply standard programming structures for appropriate situations. The module will cover the use of variables, conditions, loops, subprograms, abstraction mechanisms and structured data types.

You will practise solving problems by breaking them down into smaller tasks. As well as constructing software that works, you will also start to consider the quality of your code and produce software that is reliable and maintainable by working to professional standards. You will learn to test, debug and maintain software of an appropriate size and to manage your time in constructing well-structured software products. We will study one programming language in detail on this module.

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KF5003 -

Network Technology 2 (Core,20 Credits)

You will be provided with a detailed, technical introduction to the problem of routing and switching data packets in computer networks and to the design and implementation of Local Area Networks using routers and switches. A particular feature of the module is that it closely follows the programme for CCNA 2 of Cisco’s Networking Academy programme.

The main topics you will engage with on this module include:

1. Basic and advanced IP addressing.
2. Switches, switching concepts and switch configuration. Spanning Tree Protocol (STP).
3. Virtual LANs (VLANs) and VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP).
4. Introduction to the role of routers and routing in modern computer networks.
5. An introduction to network security.

More information

KF5004 -

Advanced Operating Systems 1 (Core,20 Credits)

The lectures covering the theoretical/standards components of network services and functionality and how they map to a business infrastructure.
The Seminars will cover the current operating systems support for these protocols and services and allow the student to implement these services/facilities and apply them to business needs with a theoretical underpinning.
This module aims to provide an experience in the practical use and application of an operating system in a network environment to provide the essential services required for a commercial organisation.
This module will allow the student to develop skills in the configuration of an operating systems in a networked environment.
The module provides an opportunity for the student to develop an appreciation of services and the practical skills required for developing and deploying network services into a corporate infrastructure.

More information

KF5005 -

Principles of Digital Security and Forensics (Core,20 Credits)

You will have the opportunity to analyse and examine digital security and forensic case studies using the latest industry specialist utilities and tools, giving invaluable hands-on practical use. Learning and teaching will take place through a variety of mechanisms. Topics will be introduced in lectures and discussed through seminar activities and guided learning activities. The theoretical material on digital security and forensics will be re-enforced through the critical analysis and discussion of case studies in seminar sessions as well as sessions on the use of security and digital forensics tools in the analysis of chosen case studies in lab-based practical sessions.

More information

KF5006 -

Applied Programming (Core,20 Credits)

The module aims to provide you with the practical ability and understanding of the software development process to enable the production of efficient and robust software applications . The module follows on from the first-year module “Programming 1” and combines lectures and workshops that are designed to further develop your problem solving and algorithmic thinking focussed on a specific topic chosen from the areas of Computer Forensics, Computer Networking or Cybersecurity.

More information

KF5007 -

Security Case Project (Core,20 Credits)

The module provides you with the opportunity to develop your skills and knowledge of cyber security through the examination of the principles, theories, technical skills and research issues associated with the disciplines of ethical hacking and computer security.

The module develops technical aspects of the subject with particular reference to enhancing computer and network security. You will have the opportunity to practice techniques and tools associated with penetration testing and evaluate a range of threats, including the use of various hacking tools and techniques over a variety of operating systems and platforms. You will also have the opportunity to develop their research skills in designing and evaluating security vulnerabilities and countermeasures.

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV5029 -

Human Factors in Cyber Security (Core,20 Credits)

This module is set in the context of human-centred security and highlights the symbiotic relationship between both parties for holistic security solutions. You will learn about the role of humans in security ecosystems, and how they can both be the weakest and strongest link across any threats or countermeasures. You will also learn how to tailor security processes and tools to different job roles, and move towards understanding security as a process rather than as a solution. Topics include basic definitions of terminology alongside practical and theoretical frameworks to help you identify key usability and security issues, and explore potential preventative measures. You will also be introduced to basic research principles, including ethics, quantitative and qualitative methods to support the completion of your assignment. Key topics include:

Usable authentication
Usable encryption
Social engineering
Organisational Security Culture
Inclusive security
Quantitative & qualitative research methods
Professionalism
Privacy
Ethics
User education and awareness
IoT & emerging technologies

More information

AT5004 -

Year in International Business (This is made up of 5 modules studied in Newcastle (Semester 1) & Amsterdam (Semester 2) (Optional,120 Credits)

This overarching module descriptor covers the Year in International Business which is made up of 5 modules which students study in Newcastle (semester 1) and Amsterdam (semester 2).

This additional year of studies has been designed to develop students’ business awareness and their soft skills through a semester of study in the UK followed by engagement in studying in Amsterdam and working on real business projects to further enhance and develop this knowledge, skills and attributes.

Semester 1 in the UK comprises three 20-credit modules aimed at students new to business and management, which also equips the students for a semester in Amsterdam, working in teams on a “real-world”, client facing project. Of the modules studies in Semester 1 provide students with the “soft”, “analytical” and “project management” skills necessary to embark on a “real-world” client-centred consultancy project in Semester 2. In Semester 2, students will work move to Amsterdam and study two modules on Northumbria licensed premises. The first module, Group Business Consultancy Project, is a Level 5 40 credit Consultancy Project providing a supported and challenging experience with real business supervised by Northumbria and possibly Dutch academics. The final module complements the development of business knowledge and application through a contextualised consideration of International Business. This will also add to the Business Consultancy experience, thereby guaranteeing a coherent business experience.

The modules are outlined below:

Semester 1
HR9505 Managing People at Work (20 credits)
SM9511 Global Business Environment (20 credits)
AF5022 Financial Decision Making (20 credits)

Semester 2
AT5000 Digital Business (20)
AT5001 Group Business Consultancy Project (40 credits)

In semester 1, students will learn in an environment aligned to that of business students on full time programmes. A mixture of large group and small group sessions will take place. In semester 2, in accordance with the experiential learning pedagogical approach in the Business Clinic operated at Newcastle Business School, the group consultancy work will involve students working in groups, facilitated by academics but also independently and amongst their peers in collaborative project work to provide real business consultancy. Assessment has been developed in accordance with Northumbria’s Assessment for Learning principles including a broad mix of assessment appropriate to the learning outcomes being assessed and with opportunities for formative feedback.

A student who passes all modules will, on successful completion of their undergraduate programme of study, have the title “(Year in International Business UK and Amsterdam)” added to their degree award title. Students who do not pass 120 credits will have those modules that have been completed recorded on their transcript.

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV5007 -

Work placement year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment to provide you with the option to take a one year work placement as part of your programme.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, as well as accreditation bodies such as BCS, IET, IMechE, RICS, CIOB and CIBSE within the appropriate working environments. Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised both in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Your placement period will normally be full-time and must total a minimum of 40 weeks.

More information

KV5008 -

Study abroad year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one full year as part of your programme.

This is a 120 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

More information

KC6012 -

Graduate Enterprise (Optional,20 Credits)

The aim of this module is to encourage the understanding and application of business and management competences as applied to small business. It will provide you with an understanding and application of competencies required to create and operate a small enterprise. You will gain a practical (learning by doing) insight into the setting up and operation of a small business, and will have a raised awareness of the self-employment opportunities that graduates can exploit, developing a critical awareness of small business creation and operation and of the enterprise economy.

You will cover topics such as:
• Small Business in the economy.
• Business idea generation.
• Entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial team.
• Business planning and finance and use of advisors.
• Marketing and market research.
• Sales for SMEs.
• Effective presentation.
• Networking.
• Public relations.
• Information and control of enterprise.
• Business growth.
• Financial outcomes and reporting.
• Legal issues.

More information

KF6002 -

Legal and Evidentiary Aspects of Digital Forensics (Optional,20 Credits)

Through the analysis and examination of digital forensic case studies, you will develop a critical appreciation of the legal and regulatory aspects of a digital forensic investigation. You will also apply the theory and skills derived from the relevant taught modules on this programme to an advanced level by undertaking a detailed digital forensics investigation. You will develop analytical and evaluative skills in the appropriate use of digital forensic tools for solving problems in a variety of environments and situations

More information

KF6003 -

Advanced Operating Systems II (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to extend the theoretical and practical implementation of Network Services in a hybrid networked environment and to investigate the current and future trends of network services. The module will provide an opportunity for you to develop the skills and knowledge to critically appraise and select the features of current OS's and how they are configured and integrated to provide corporate level services. You will learn how to analyse the requirements of a business and then map those requirements into a hybrid network environment utilising services appropriately.

The syllabus of the module will cover topics such as:
- Network OS implementation of TCP/IP
- OS implementations of (e.g.) system accounting, security
- Hybrid deployment of (e.g.) DNS, HTTP, file sharing, database services (e.g. MySQL).

More information

KF6004 -

Wireless Networks and Security (Core,20 Credits)

This module is designed to be suitable for a variety of networking professional roles including those wishing to gain a deeper understanding of 802.11 protocols, security and enterprise deployment. Additionally, it is suitable for wireless network administrators and support or design staff requiring a greater understanding of the new technologies and applications of modern converged networks and delegates seeking Certified Wireless Network Associate (or similar) certification. You will study the following areas:

Enterprise wireless deployment elements and methodologies.
Basic RF charactersitics for mobile systems
802.11 protocol operation and technologies
wireless security issues and attack vulnerabilities.

More information

KF6005 -

Network Technology 3 (Core,20 Credits)

You will be provided with a detailed examination of Enterprise and Wide Area Networks (WANs). A particular feature of the module is the incorporation of subject areas from the final module of Cisco’s Networking Academy programme CCNA.

The main topics you will engage with on this module include:



1. Introduction to Enterprise and Wide Area Networks (WANs): Theory and practice of relevant protocols and technologies, including: PPP, OSPF, MPLS, GRE, VPN, IPSec.
2. Topics related to Enterprise and WANs including NAT, PAT, DHCP.
3. Network performance and security in an Enterprise and WAN context.

More information

KF6012 -

Web Application Integration (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn how to write robust web applications that integrate server-side and client-side technologies. For the server side you will learn how to create reusable components written in Object Oriented PHP and how to use database systems including SQLite. For the client-side you will learn how to create robust Single Page Applications (SPA) using a modern JavaScript framework such as React or AngularJS. To integrate the client and server sides you will learn how to structure data as JSON and the use of HTTP methods and approaches for interaction. You will also learn how to implement and use token-based approaches for authentication. The module will set the approaches you learn in the context of architectural concerns including maintainability, scalability, security and robustness. You will become familiar with architectural concepts including Representational State Transfer (REST), Model View Controller (MVC), and Multitier (N-tier), as well as gain an appreciation of applied object-oriented and component-based development.

More information

KF6015 -

Games Design (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn about the design of computer games, the needs of and the issues facing the games industry and their impact upon games design. You will analyse a games problem and create a design for their solution using industry standard methods. In particular you will learn about:
• Principles of good game design
• The elements of game design
• How games are made in the industry and the makeup of the industry
• Professional, legal, social and ethical issues faced by the industry in general, and how they affect the game designer.

More information

KF6018 -

Computer Graphics and Animation (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will provide you with knowledge and understanding of the theoretical background to and the practical implementation of computer graphics and computer animation, which are two major components in the movie and game industries. They are also used in other industries for design and advertisement, such as furniture and car companies. On this module you will have the opportunity to experience hardware equipment used in the industries, such as a 3D motion capture system, 3D scanners and 3D printers, to help you better understand state-of-the-art computer graphics and animation pipelines.

You will learn about 3D modelling and rendering, perception principles, visualisation techniques, animation algorithms and simulations and how to implement software algorithms for 3D modelling, rendering, visualization and simulations - which you will use to develop your own software artefact. This module will cover the following topics:

1. Basic 3D geometry concepts, such as coordinates, transformations, view projections, etc.
2. 3D rendering components, such as modelling, illumination, shadowing, texture mapping, etc.
3. Basic perception principles, such as gestalt principles, change blindness, colour theory, etc.
4. Visualization techniques, such as multivariate visualization methods, trees, networks, flow and volume visualization, etc.
5. Character animation algorithms, such as motion capture, keyframe animation, forward/inverse kinematics, etc.
6. Physical simulations algorithms, such as cloth simulation, deformable objects, etc.

The module will, where appropriate, make use of well-known research papers and journals in computer graphics and animation, to help you develop your critical thinking skills, as well as your research and development skills.

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV6003 -

Individual Computing Project (Core,40 Credits)

This module is an individual project where you have the opportunity to choose or define your own topic which will lead to you producing a significant piece of work related to the aims of your programme. To do this you will need to use and further develop skills that you have learned elsewhere in your course. You will become knowledgeable in your chosen topic including important concepts and literature and you will acquire new skills or learning (or extend existing skills or learning) that are needed to carry out the project. These could be technical skills such as a new programming language, or other knowledge and skills such as experimental methods used in your chosen area or the use of statistical techniques to analyse your results. You will also acquire or further develop skills in areas such as report writing, literature searching, research methods, data analysis, project management and personal time management.

You have the opportunity to choose between three structures for your project, including
• Software Engineering - suitable for projects whose emphasis is the construction of a piece of software (a product) for actual use or to a similar standard, following sound and thorough software engineering processes; you will be required to justify the product requirements and the tools and techniques used in support of the development.
• General - suitable for projects where an element of investigation is an important feature, and will include a significant literature review. The product may be a prototype aimed at supporting the investigation. It is also suitable for research-based projects or others whose main product is a computing deliverable other than software, e.g. a well-engineered design whose specification involves a significant element of supporting investigation of relevant literature, or a piece of computing hardware
• Investigative - for projects that carry out a significant piece of research or investigation. These projects must make use of practical computing skills related to your programme, but do not produce a substantial product.

Your project must include you undertaking practical work of some sort using computing/IT technology. This is most frequently achieved by the creation of an artefact as the focus for covering all or part of an implementation life-cycle. Projects based solely on literature review activity and/or user/market surveys are not acceptable.

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

KF4001 -

Introduction to Computer Security and Forensics (Core,20 Credits)

You will be given a rounded introduction to the principles of computer forensics and cyber security from both a theoretical and technical perspective and also provide a contextual setting for these disciplines by an examination of the criminal justice system within England and Wales. The ethical responsibilities of studying computer forensics and cyber security and the need to address personal and professional integrity will be included in the module.

More information

KF4002 -

Network Technology 1 (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn about the reference communication architecture, communication protocols, networking devices, IP addressing important performance metrics for communication networks, wireless network and fundamentals of physical layer communication.

More information

KF4005 -

Operating Systems Fundamentals (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces you to the fundamentals of operating systems: processes/threads, communication, memory management, file systems, I/O, security, scripting languages and tools. You will study:
* processes and threads: concepts, use and implementation, creation and destruction, context switching, scheduling;
* communication (IPC): shared memory, message passing, pipes;
* memory management: memory allocation schemes, paging, virtual memory;
* persistent storage and file systems: file concept, file system structure and implementation, directories, free space allocation;
* I/O: input and output devices, device handlers, the I/O API;
* security: access control, user authentication;
* scripting languages and tools: use of languages and tools (e.g. the command shell, Python) for monitoring, investigating and administering an operating system and its resources, employ a relational database (including the design and execution of simple SQL queries).

More information

KF4009 -

Web Technologies (Core,20 Credits)

The aim of the module is to provide you with knowledge and skills in designing and implementing web applications, including appropriate technologies. You will develop web based applications in accordance to key web standards and user needs. The module will also emphasise the technical aspects of web development and will introduce web security issues. In particular, you will cover topics such as:

• Structured mark-up
• Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), including layout design using CSS
• Usability and accessibility, including user needs
• Information architecture
• Client-side processing
• Web serving
• Introduction to server-side programming
• Introduction to web related security issues

More information

KF4010 -

Computing Fundamentals (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide you with the theoretical and practical basis to understand the design and construction of Computer software and hardware. You will be introduced to the underlying theory of Computation and the major paradigms of Computation. This will include the concepts of software, systems and data modelling and in particular the major computational models and programming paradigms. To complement this theoretical underpinning you will also study the standard von Neumann computer architecture and von Neumann machine programming.

More information

KV4000 -

Programming 1 (Core,20 Credits)

During this module you will learn how to create software using a programming language. You will learn to select and apply standard programming structures for appropriate situations. The module will cover the use of variables, conditions, loops, subprograms, abstraction mechanisms and structured data types.

You will practise solving problems by breaking them down into smaller tasks. As well as constructing software that works, you will also start to consider the quality of your code and produce software that is reliable and maintainable by working to professional standards. You will learn to test, debug and maintain software of an appropriate size and to manage your time in constructing well-structured software products. We will study one programming language in detail on this module.

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KF5003 -

Network Technology 2 (Core,20 Credits)

You will be provided with a detailed, technical introduction to the problem of routing and switching data packets in computer networks and to the design and implementation of Local Area Networks using routers and switches. A particular feature of the module is that it closely follows the programme for CCNA 2 of Cisco’s Networking Academy programme.

The main topics you will engage with on this module include:

1. Basic and advanced IP addressing.
2. Switches, switching concepts and switch configuration. Spanning Tree Protocol (STP).
3. Virtual LANs (VLANs) and VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP).
4. Introduction to the role of routers and routing in modern computer networks.
5. An introduction to network security.

More information

KF5004 -

Advanced Operating Systems 1 (Core,20 Credits)

The lectures covering the theoretical/standards components of network services and functionality and how they map to a business infrastructure.
The Seminars will cover the current operating systems support for these protocols and services and allow the student to implement these services/facilities and apply them to business needs with a theoretical underpinning.
This module aims to provide an experience in the practical use and application of an operating system in a network environment to provide the essential services required for a commercial organisation.
This module will allow the student to develop skills in the configuration of an operating systems in a networked environment.
The module provides an opportunity for the student to develop an appreciation of services and the practical skills required for developing and deploying network services into a corporate infrastructure.

More information

KF5005 -

Principles of Digital Security and Forensics (Core,20 Credits)

You will have the opportunity to analyse and examine digital security and forensic case studies using the latest industry specialist utilities and tools, giving invaluable hands-on practical use. Learning and teaching will take place through a variety of mechanisms. Topics will be introduced in lectures and discussed through seminar activities and guided learning activities. The theoretical material on digital security and forensics will be re-enforced through the critical analysis and discussion of case studies in seminar sessions as well as sessions on the use of security and digital forensics tools in the analysis of chosen case studies in lab-based practical sessions.

More information

KF5006 -

Applied Programming (Core,20 Credits)

The module aims to provide you with the practical ability and understanding of the software development process to enable the production of efficient and robust software applications . The module follows on from the first-year module “Programming 1” and combines lectures and workshops that are designed to further develop your problem solving and algorithmic thinking focussed on a specific topic chosen from the areas of Computer Forensics, Computer Networking or Cybersecurity.

More information

KF5007 -

Security Case Project (Core,20 Credits)

The module provides you with the opportunity to develop your skills and knowledge of cyber security through the examination of the principles, theories, technical skills and research issues associated with the disciplines of ethical hacking and computer security.

The module develops technical aspects of the subject with particular reference to enhancing computer and network security. You will have the opportunity to practice techniques and tools associated with penetration testing and evaluate a range of threats, including the use of various hacking tools and techniques over a variety of operating systems and platforms. You will also have the opportunity to develop their research skills in designing and evaluating security vulnerabilities and countermeasures.

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV5029 -

Human Factors in Cyber Security (Core,20 Credits)

This module is set in the context of human-centred security and highlights the symbiotic relationship between both parties for holistic security solutions. You will learn about the role of humans in security ecosystems, and how they can both be the weakest and strongest link across any threats or countermeasures. You will also learn how to tailor security processes and tools to different job roles, and move towards understanding security as a process rather than as a solution. Topics include basic definitions of terminology alongside practical and theoretical frameworks to help you identify key usability and security issues, and explore potential preventative measures. You will also be introduced to basic research principles, including ethics, quantitative and qualitative methods to support the completion of your assignment. Key topics include:

Usable authentication
Usable encryption
Social engineering
Organisational Security Culture
Inclusive security
Quantitative & qualitative research methods
Professionalism
Privacy
Ethics
User education and awareness
IoT & emerging technologies

More information

AT5004 -

Year in International Business (This is made up of 5 modules studied in Newcastle (Semester 1) & Amsterdam (Semester 2) (Optional,120 Credits)

This overarching module descriptor covers the Year in International Business which is made up of 5 modules which students study in Newcastle (semester 1) and Amsterdam (semester 2).

This additional year of studies has been designed to develop students’ business awareness and their soft skills through a semester of study in the UK followed by engagement in studying in Amsterdam and working on real business projects to further enhance and develop this knowledge, skills and attributes.

Semester 1 in the UK comprises three 20-credit modules aimed at students new to business and management, which also equips the students for a semester in Amsterdam, working in teams on a “real-world”, client facing project. Of the modules studies in Semester 1 provide students with the “soft”, “analytical” and “project management” skills necessary to embark on a “real-world” client-centred consultancy project in Semester 2. In Semester 2, students will work move to Amsterdam and study two modules on Northumbria licensed premises. The first module, Group Business Consultancy Project, is a Level 5 40 credit Consultancy Project providing a supported and challenging experience with real business supervised by Northumbria and possibly Dutch academics. The final module complements the development of business knowledge and application through a contextualised consideration of International Business. This will also add to the Business Consultancy experience, thereby guaranteeing a coherent business experience.

The modules are outlined below:

Semester 1
HR9505 Managing People at Work (20 credits)
SM9511 Global Business Environment (20 credits)
AF5022 Financial Decision Making (20 credits)

Semester 2
AT5000 Digital Business (20)
AT5001 Group Business Consultancy Project (40 credits)

In semester 1, students will learn in an environment aligned to that of business students on full time programmes. A mixture of large group and small group sessions will take place. In semester 2, in accordance with the experiential learning pedagogical approach in the Business Clinic operated at Newcastle Business School, the group consultancy work will involve students working in groups, facilitated by academics but also independently and amongst their peers in collaborative project work to provide real business consultancy. Assessment has been developed in accordance with Northumbria’s Assessment for Learning principles including a broad mix of assessment appropriate to the learning outcomes being assessed and with opportunities for formative feedback.

A student who passes all modules will, on successful completion of their undergraduate programme of study, have the title “(Year in International Business UK and Amsterdam)” added to their degree award title. Students who do not pass 120 credits will have those modules that have been completed recorded on their transcript.

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV5007 -

Work placement year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment to provide you with the option to take a one year work placement as part of your programme.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, as well as accreditation bodies such as BCS, IET, IMechE, RICS, CIOB and CIBSE within the appropriate working environments. Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised both in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Your placement period will normally be full-time and must total a minimum of 40 weeks.

More information

KV5008 -

Study abroad year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one full year as part of your programme.

This is a 120 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

More information

KC6012 -

Graduate Enterprise (Optional,20 Credits)

The aim of this module is to encourage the understanding and application of business and management competences as applied to small business. It will provide you with an understanding and application of competencies required to create and operate a small enterprise. You will gain a practical (learning by doing) insight into the setting up and operation of a small business, and will have a raised awareness of the self-employment opportunities that graduates can exploit, developing a critical awareness of small business creation and operation and of the enterprise economy.

You will cover topics such as:
• Small Business in the economy.
• Business idea generation.
• Entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial team.
• Business planning and finance and use of advisors.
• Marketing and market research.
• Sales for SMEs.
• Effective presentation.
• Networking.
• Public relations.
• Information and control of enterprise.
• Business growth.
• Financial outcomes and reporting.
• Legal issues.

More information

KF6002 -

Legal and Evidentiary Aspects of Digital Forensics (Optional,20 Credits)

Through the analysis and examination of digital forensic case studies, you will develop a critical appreciation of the legal and regulatory aspects of a digital forensic investigation. You will also apply the theory and skills derived from the relevant taught modules on this programme to an advanced level by undertaking a detailed digital forensics investigation. You will develop analytical and evaluative skills in the appropriate use of digital forensic tools for solving problems in a variety of environments and situations

More information

KF6003 -

Advanced Operating Systems II (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to extend the theoretical and practical implementation of Network Services in a hybrid networked environment and to investigate the current and future trends of network services. The module will provide an opportunity for you to develop the skills and knowledge to critically appraise and select the features of current OS's and how they are configured and integrated to provide corporate level services. You will learn how to analyse the requirements of a business and then map those requirements into a hybrid network environment utilising services appropriately.

The syllabus of the module will cover topics such as:
- Network OS implementation of TCP/IP
- OS implementations of (e.g.) system accounting, security
- Hybrid deployment of (e.g.) DNS, HTTP, file sharing, database services (e.g. MySQL).

More information

KF6004 -

Wireless Networks and Security (Core,20 Credits)

This module is designed to be suitable for a variety of networking professional roles including those wishing to gain a deeper understanding of 802.11 protocols, security and enterprise deployment. Additionally, it is suitable for wireless network administrators and support or design staff requiring a greater understanding of the new technologies and applications of modern converged networks and delegates seeking Certified Wireless Network Associate (or similar) certification. You will study the following areas:

Enterprise wireless deployment elements and methodologies.
Basic RF charactersitics for mobile systems
802.11 protocol operation and technologies
wireless security issues and attack vulnerabilities.

More information

KF6005 -

Network Technology 3 (Core,20 Credits)

You will be provided with a detailed examination of Enterprise and Wide Area Networks (WANs). A particular feature of the module is the incorporation of subject areas from the final module of Cisco’s Networking Academy programme CCNA.

The main topics you will engage with on this module include:



1. Introduction to Enterprise and Wide Area Networks (WANs): Theory and practice of relevant protocols and technologies, including: PPP, OSPF, MPLS, GRE, VPN, IPSec.
2. Topics related to Enterprise and WANs including NAT, PAT, DHCP.
3. Network performance and security in an Enterprise and WAN context.

More information

KF6012 -

Web Application Integration (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn how to write robust web applications that integrate server-side and client-side technologies. For the server side you will learn how to create reusable components written in Object Oriented PHP and how to use database systems including SQLite. For the client-side you will learn how to create robust Single Page Applications (SPA) using a modern JavaScript framework such as React or AngularJS. To integrate the client and server sides you will learn how to structure data as JSON and the use of HTTP methods and approaches for interaction. You will also learn how to implement and use token-based approaches for authentication. The module will set the approaches you learn in the context of architectural concerns including maintainability, scalability, security and robustness. You will become familiar with architectural concepts including Representational State Transfer (REST), Model View Controller (MVC), and Multitier (N-tier), as well as gain an appreciation of applied object-oriented and component-based development.

More information

KF6015 -

Games Design (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn about the design of computer games, the needs of and the issues facing the games industry and their impact upon games design. You will analyse a games problem and create a design for their solution using industry standard methods. In particular you will learn about:
• Principles of good game design
• The elements of game design
• How games are made in the industry and the makeup of the industry
• Professional, legal, social and ethical issues faced by the industry in general, and how they affect the game designer.

More information

KF6018 -

Computer Graphics and Animation (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will provide you with knowledge and understanding of the theoretical background to and the practical implementation of computer graphics and computer animation, which are two major components in the movie and game industries. They are also used in other industries for design and advertisement, such as furniture and car companies. On this module you will have the opportunity to experience hardware equipment used in the industries, such as a 3D motion capture system, 3D scanners and 3D printers, to help you better understand state-of-the-art computer graphics and animation pipelines.

You will learn about 3D modelling and rendering, perception principles, visualisation techniques, animation algorithms and simulations and how to implement software algorithms for 3D modelling, rendering, visualization and simulations - which you will use to develop your own software artefact. This module will cover the following topics:

1. Basic 3D geometry concepts, such as coordinates, transformations, view projections, etc.
2. 3D rendering components, such as modelling, illumination, shadowing, texture mapping, etc.
3. Basic perception principles, such as gestalt principles, change blindness, colour theory, etc.
4. Visualization techniques, such as multivariate visualization methods, trees, networks, flow and volume visualization, etc.
5. Character animation algorithms, such as motion capture, keyframe animation, forward/inverse kinematics, etc.
6. Physical simulations algorithms, such as cloth simulation, deformable objects, etc.

The module will, where appropriate, make use of well-known research papers and journals in computer graphics and animation, to help you develop your critical thinking skills, as well as your research and development skills.

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV6003 -

Individual Computing Project (Core,40 Credits)

This module is an individual project where you have the opportunity to choose or define your own topic which will lead to you producing a significant piece of work related to the aims of your programme. To do this you will need to use and further develop skills that you have learned elsewhere in your course. You will become knowledgeable in your chosen topic including important concepts and literature and you will acquire new skills or learning (or extend existing skills or learning) that are needed to carry out the project. These could be technical skills such as a new programming language, or other knowledge and skills such as experimental methods used in your chosen area or the use of statistical techniques to analyse your results. You will also acquire or further develop skills in areas such as report writing, literature searching, research methods, data analysis, project management and personal time management.

You have the opportunity to choose between three structures for your project, including
• Software Engineering - suitable for projects whose emphasis is the construction of a piece of software (a product) for actual use or to a similar standard, following sound and thorough software engineering processes; you will be required to justify the product requirements and the tools and techniques used in support of the development.
• General - suitable for projects where an element of investigation is an important feature, and will include a significant literature review. The product may be a prototype aimed at supporting the investigation. It is also suitable for research-based projects or others whose main product is a computing deliverable other than software, e.g. a well-engineered design whose specification involves a significant element of supporting investigation of relevant literature, or a piece of computing hardware
• Investigative - for projects that carry out a significant piece of research or investigation. These projects must make use of practical computing skills related to your programme, but do not produce a substantial product.

Your project must include you undertaking practical work of some sort using computing/IT technology. This is most frequently achieved by the creation of an artefact as the focus for covering all or part of an implementation life-cycle. Projects based solely on literature review activity and/or user/market surveys are not acceptable.

More information

To start your application, simply select the month you would like to start your course.

Computer Networks and Cyber Security BSc (Hons)

Home or EU applicants please apply through UCAS

International applicants please apply using the links below

START MONTH
YEAR

UniStats

Any Questions?

Our admissions team will be happy to help. They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901.

Contact Details for Applicants:

bc.applicantservices@northumbria.ac.uk

All information on this course page is accurate at the time of viewing.

Courses starting in 2021 are offered as a mix of online and face to face teaching due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.

We continue to monitor government and local authority guidance in relation to Covid-19 and we are ready and able to flex accordingly to ensure the health and safety of our students and staff.

Students will be required to attend campus as far as restrictions allow. Contact time will increase as restrictions ease, or decrease, potentially to a full online offer, should restrictions increase.

Our online activity will be delivered through Blackboard Ultra, enabling collaboration, connection and engagement with materials and people.

 

Current, Relevant and Inspiring

We continuously review and improve course content in consultation with our students and employers. To make sure we can inform you of any changes to your course register for updates on the course page.


Your Learning Experience find out about our distinctive approach at 
www.northumbria.ac.uk/exp

Admissions Terms and Conditions - northumbria.ac.uk/terms
Fees and Funding - northumbria.ac.uk/fees
Admissions Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/adpolicy
Admissions Complaints Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/complaints



You might also be interested in...

Order your prospectus

If you're a UK/EU student and would like to know more about our courses, you can order a copy of our prospectus here.

course pdf image

Get a downloadable PDF of this course and updates from Computer and Information Sciences

Enter your details to receive an email with a link to a downloadable PDF of this course and to receive the latest news and information from Northumbria University

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

a sign in front of a crowd
+

Northumbria Open Days

Open Days are a great way for you to get a feel of the University, the city of Newcastle upon Tyne and the course(s) you are interested in.

a person sitting at a table using a laptop
+
a bridge over a body of water
+

Virtual Tour

Get an insight into life at Northumbria at the click of a button! Come and explore our videos and 360 panoramas to immerse yourself in our campuses and get a feel for what it is like studying here using our interactive virtual tour.

Back to top